8 Feb

This is why the US lags the world in math and science

A residence hall at the University of Illinois has invited Annie Sprinkle, a famous porn star from the 1970s and 80s, to conduct a sex education week, which is set to culminate with an “Orgasm Workshop” Thursday night.

Sprinkle plans to play students her documentary “Annie Sprinkle’s Amazing World of Orgasm” which features interviews with 26 “orgasm experts” and describes itself as a ”poetic homage to the big O.”

Laura Haber, the program director for Unit One, the resident community that is hosting the week, said the workshop will involve participation from students but will bar all nudity.

“They’re participating, but they’re fully clothed,” she clarified.

Haber would not release the cost of events but she did say they were funded with student fees paid by residents of the community.

The week also included a speech from Sprinkle detailing her career as a porn star, a Free Sidewalk Sex Clinic, and a presentation on “Eco-sexology.”

Annie Sprinkle, born Ellen Steinberg, starred in adult films such as “Teenage Deviate” and “Big Busty 3.” She holds a Ph.D. in human sexuality and currently works as a performance artist and a sex educator.

At the Free Sidewalk Sex Clinic, which was conducted in a public space, participants practiced sexual techniques using anatomical models.

Sprinkle also showed explicit clips from her adult films during her speech at Allen Hall. According to the Daily Illini, student response was mixed to her acting highlights.

Campus Reform

       

About DrJohn

DrJohn has been a health care professional for more than 30 years. In addition to clinical practice he has done extensive research and has published widely with over 70 original articles and abstracts in the peer-reviewed literature. DrJohn is well known in his field and has lectured on every continent except for Antarctica. He has been married to the same wonderful lady for over 30 years and has three kids- two sons, both of whom are attorneys and one daughter on her way into the field of education. DrJohn was brought up with the concept that one can do well if one is prepared to work hard but nothing in life is guaranteed. Except for liberals being foolish.

2 Responses to This is why the US lags the world in math and science

  1. mathman says: 1

    Hoo boy!
    I just decided to get another degree.
    Just goes to show what is really important these days.

    No. The real reason we lag behind in math and science is political correctness. Having standards, we have been assured, is racist. Any test which can be shown to have different grade averages for different “ethnic groups” fails the PC test. So such tests have been watered down to meaningless exercises.
    The trouble, of course, is that creative people come from creative families, which is inherently discriminatory. So the PC mantra is that if I can’t create as well as you, you have to be suppressed.
    Were we to return to standards, we would do a lot better.

    ReplyReply
  2. bbartlog says: 2

    White Americans are doing fine in math and science, thanks. If you go to the trouble of breaking out the international PISA test scores by race (which the test organizers make rather inconvenient) you can see that we’re more or less second only to Finland in terms of the quality of our educational system. See here: http://www.vdare.com/articles/pisa-scores-show-demography-is-destiny-in-education-too-but-washington-doesnt-want-you-to-k
    Now, to be sure, Americans as a whole aren’t doing so well. The problem is demographic; since black and hispanic students score lower *and* are present in ever increasing proportions in the younger cohorts, overall test averages are sinking. If you’re a die-hard blank slatist then I suppose this means that the educational system is broken and is failing these poor minority students. Personally, it looks to me more like a reason for making illegal immigration amnesty difficult.
    As for this Orgasm Workshop, it’s an irrelevant sideshow – at best a symptom of degeneracy and not a cause. You can bet that if they had had such a thing at Carnegie-Mellon University when I was there, *very* few of the science and technology majors (or architects for that matter) would have found time for it between studying for their courses.

    ReplyReply

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