2 Jan

After Egypt’s Morsi calls for ‘Dialogue’, Satirist promptly investigated by prosecutors for criticizing Morsi

Walid Shoebat:

The ‘dialogue skeptics’ win another round.

Shortly after codifying Sharia law in Egypt by signing the Constitution, Muslim Brotherhood president, Mohamed Morsi called for ‘dialogue’. Barely one week later, prosecutors are investigating a satirist for being critical of Morsi.

Via Al-Jazeera:

An Egyptian satirist who has made fun of President Mohamed Morsi on television will be investigated by prosecutors following an accusation that he undermined the leader’s standing, a judicial source has said.

Bassem Youssef’s case will likely increase concerns over freedom of speech in the post-Hosni Mubarak era, especially when the country’s new constitution includes provisions criticised by rights activists for, among other things, said the source on Tuesday, forbidding insults.

Understand how history repeats itself with today’s persecution of Christians in Islamic countries and compare to the plight of the Jews in Nazi Occupied Europe, click her for details.

In a separate case, one of Egypt’s leading independent newspapers said it was being investigated by the prosecutor following a complaint from the presidency, which accused it of publishing false news.

Youssef rose to fame following the uprising that swept Mubarak from power in February 2011 with a satirical online programme that has been compared to Jon Stewart’s Daily Show in the US.

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About Curt

Curt served in the Marine Corps for four years and has been a law enforcement officer in Los Angeles for the last 24 years.

One Response to After Egypt’s Morsi calls for ‘Dialogue’, Satirist promptly investigated by prosecutors for criticizing Morsi

  1. Nan G says: 1

    One of the best gags in “The Princess Bride” is when Wallace Shawn’s character keeps saying, “Inconceivable” with every one of Westley’s heroic escapades, at which point Mandy Patinkin’s Inigo Montoya responds, “I don’t think that word means what you think it means.”
    In most Sharia-based Constitutions words like freedom of expression, human rights, religious freedom, and so on are often found.
    But guess what?
    Those words, in Islam, don’t mean anything like what you thought they meant.
    Under Sharia women’s rights mean the right to be owned, first by dad then by a husband and last, if widowed, by either her own sons or her brothers.
    In Islam this is their idea of a free woman.
    Being owned.
    George Orwell would have been astonished.

    Morsi called for ”dialogue?”
    What he was actually doing was giving his opposition enough rope to hang themselves for insulting the prophet’s representative.

    ReplyReply

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