23 Aug

The Mormon Economy

                                       


President Reagan spends some time in Utah visiting the
LDS Welfare system and learning how it works. Here’s
a photo with him and the former (center) and current LDS Church Presidents (right).

With the selection of Mitt Romney as the Republican nominee for the office of President of the United States, a lot of attention has come to his church (and mine) – The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. I was asked if I would write a post that detailed the church’s welfare program. This post isn’t meant to recruit or convert people to my church. Rather, it’s to convince people that work requirements as a condition of receiving welfare or other benefits have positive results and benefit society.

When we conservatives hear the word welfare, we almost cringe. Not because we don’t think it’s important to care for the poor, but because of HOW we care for the poor. President Obama has been called the “Welfare President” and the “Food Stamp President.” Last month, he ended the work requirement for welfare recipients, turning the program into a one-way benefit that incentivized laziness.

Since the President took office in 2009, food stamp use has jumped 46%! Spending on the welfare program has more than doubled to nearly $76 billion annually. As of last month, nearly 5% of ALL AMERICANS are on some form of welfare.

While our politicians like to battle with each other about the efficiency and future of these programs, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (“the LDS Church” or “Mormons”) has successfully managed a fully funded, non-governmental program for more than 76 years. The thing that distinguishes this program from state and federal programs is something that I’d like to highlight here in the hopes that the talking heads in Washington see how a good welfare program can actually make people more productive and less dependent.

The program was started in 1936 by then-First Counselor David O. McKay. During the inauguration, McKay stated that “[The welfare program] is established by divine revelation, and there is nothing else in the entire world that can so effectively take care of its members”

I’m a firm believer that America needs to get back to its roots. Families are no longer expected to take care of their own because the government has taken over that role. Non-profits and churches serve to merely augment those government programs. The roots of the LDS welfare program begin with the individual church member.

We follow the admonition in Proverbs to “Honour the Lord with thy substance, and with the firstfruits of all thine increase.” Our Doctrine and Covenants – an additional set of scriptures that is canonized alongside the King James Bible and Book of Mormon – clarifies a proper tithe to be 10%. Without these tithes, the church would not be able to take care of its own and others suffering through disasters.

In the early 1930s, the country was suffering the worst depression in its history. Unemployment was rampant across the country. In Utah, where the LDS Church is headquartered, unemployment was over 36%. Many people were clamoring for government assistance because they knew it would not have to be paid back. The President and prophet of the church at the time, President Heber J. Grant, said that this mentality “is all wrong.”

Church leaders began the work of helping struggling members without promoting idleness and a sense of entitlement (sound familiar?). The goal of Church leaders was to help people help themselves become independent without sacrificing the necessities of life.

In July 1933 the First Presidency set forth fundamental principles and for the first time outlined specific relief measures that could be carried out Churchwide. “ Our able-bodied members must not, except as a last resort, be put under the embarrassment of accepting something for nothing. … Church officials administering relief must devise ways and means by which all able-bodied Church members who are in need, may make compensation for aid given them by rendering some sort of service.”

Many people assume that because conservative want to require welfare recipients to work or volunteer as a condition for receiving assistance we are somehow inhumane or uncaring. For nearly 100 years, the LDS Church has made such service a part of the welfare program. No one can say that the church is either inhumane or uncaring. And only those “able-bodied” are expected to do so.

When I joined the Army in 1995, I brought home $500 per month. I was newly married and we had a kid on the way. We were eating ramen, spaghetti with butter (couldn’t afford sauce), and rice. When my old Hyundai conked out, I needed a dependable car to get to and from work. The insurance and payments for our un-air conditioned, 4-speed, Suzuki Esteem took a major chunk of our money. We pulled old mattresses out of a dumpster behind a furniture store that were traded in by customers for new ones. Since we had no frame, we slept on the mattresses on the floor. We literally lived out of our suit cases because we couldn’t afford dressers. We had a folding table for a kitchen table and a wicker chair that was given to us in our living room. We had no TV and just a portable CD player with speakers plugged in for entertainment. Thankfully, we lived at Ft. Ord and could walk to the beach or visit the Fisherman’s Wharf and sample all the free clam chowder.

One day, some leaders from church asked my wife and I if we could watch their kids while they traveled to Oakland for the day. Later that night, we heard the doorbell ring and saw them standing outside their own door. Odd. When we opened the door, they took us out to their truck where a brand new desk with a chair and dresser were loaded onto a trailer behind their truck. These items had been purchased for us after seeing how we lived. It was the first real furniture we owned and we still have it to this day even though it doesn’t match anything.

But, we were still struggling. I finally swallowed my pride and went to my bishop to ask for advice and counsel. The first question was, “are you a full tithe payer?” He didn’t ask this question because church assistance was dependent upon paying a full tithe. He asked it because we believe that there are blessings that come from paying a full tithe. These blessings weren’t being afforded my wife and I because we didn’t think we could afford to give away $50 each month.

The bishop sat down with us and we went over our budget. It was clear we weren’t wasting money nor were we trying to live above our means. He came up with a plan in which the church would pay for all of our groceries until we got back on our feet. He asked that in exchange, we pay a full and honest tithe and volunteer to help on the church farm.

The farm was really a peach grove and members of the church volunteered to pick and prune the trees. The fruit was both washed and packed whole or sliced and canned. It was then sent to storehouses throughout the country. It was hard work, but by volunteering we were given the opportunity to buy peaches at extremely low prices after each shift of work to take home. For the first time, we could actually afford to have healthy fruit in the house. I felt good knowing that the support I was being given was earned, rather than just given.

After just 4 months of being on the church’s welfare program we were somehow able to survive without it. We weren’t making any additional money and we were paying a full tithe. I personally attribute this to the blessings of my God for giving freely of my earnings. There is really no other way to explain how we were able to make ends meet and still buy groceries that were healthy and substantial for what we needed. When Emily got pregnant we did participate in the WIC program for a while, which provided beans, peanut butter and milk for us.

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Over the years, the Church welfare program has grown to meet the ever-increasing needs of an expanding Church. In North America today, 80 Church farms produce nutritious food for the needy. Eighty cannery facilities preserve and package this life-sustaining food. More than 100 bishops’ storehouses stand ready to assist more than 10,000 bishops and branch presidents as they carry out their sacred obligation to seek out and assist the poor and needy in their wards and branches. Fifty Deseret Industries operations offer work and training to thousands. Worldwide, 160 employment centers help more than 78,000 people find jobs each year. Sixty-five LDS Social Services offices help member couples adopt children and provide counseling to those in need. And throughout all these programs, one can find volunteers giving back for what was given to them.

The welfare program of the Church is well known throughout the world. People from all walks of life travel to Church headquarters to see firsthand how the Church cares for the poor and needy without creating dependency on the part of those who receive or bitterness on the part of those who give.

But the church welfare program is about more than just giving away food, clothing or money. There are many aspects of the program. There are programs that assist in addiction recovery. There are programs that help with family issues. There is single parent and family counseling. And there are programs to combat pornography.

Even after the Depression came to an end, President J. Reuben Clark, then a Counselor in the First Presidency, providentially advocated continuing the welfare program. In October 1945, U.S. President Harry S. Truman called on Church President George Albert Smith to determine how and when supplies could be delivered to devastated areas of Europe. To Truman’s astonishment, Church leaders replied that the food and clothing and other relief supplies were already collected and ready for shipping.

Over time, the Church expanded its welfare facilities and programs to cover more areas of need, including more geographical areas. In the 1970s the Church expanded its welfare projects and production to Mexico, England, and the Pacific Islands. During the following decade, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay became the first countries to receive Church employment centers outside the United States.

With the formation of Church Humanitarian Services in 1985, the Church’s international welfare efforts grew tremendously as clothing and other goods were sorted for shipment around the world in response to poverty and disasters.

When Hurricane Katrina hit the United States, LDS volunteers were in the area before the Red Cross delivering food, clothing, and other provisions. When the tsunami hit Japan, the church again played a major role in assisting families that lost their homes and lives. And when Obama’s economy hits families across the country, you can bet that the church is there lending a helping hand.

Our country would be well served to emulate the programs of the church. Besides the elderly and infirm, it is rare that individuals stay on church welfare programs for long periods of time. This is because they are expected to give back as they are given. There is no animosity in that. Church leaders sit down with recipients regularly to go over finances and ensure that an agreed-to plan is progressing. Church employment specialists are present in nearly every single church building around the world helping those without jobs to seek and find income. And here’s the kicker: it works.

As individuals develop their own self-reliance through faith in Jesus Christ, they can help others become self-reliant.

The Savior provided the perfect example of what He taught: “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matthew 25:40).

When people worry about the devastation that a Mitt Romney presidency would bring to the country, one need look no further than the standards he already lives by for the truth. Yes, to the dependency class, this would come as a shock to the system. Can you imagine if Americans were encouraged to be more dependent on themselves instead of the government by stealing the concepts of the LDS Welfare Program? Where would the liberals find their votes then? How would their nanny state function then?

The effects of making citizens work for their welfare would send such a positive rippling effect through the economy that we’ve never seen before. City, State, and Federal governments would have a huge volunteer force to assist in their programs. This would reduce the cost of payroll for literally hundreds of thousands of government workers. With a reduced payroll comes less of a need for taxes to sustain these programs and personnel. This means that citizens would have more money in their pockets to spend as they please, including by giving more to churches and non-profits better suited for handling the poverty, homeless, and jobless problem. This means that businesses would have more money to hire paid employees and grow which creates an increase in tax revenues.

Because people would be empowered to be self-sustaining and independent, there would be fewer people collecting welfare. If we force people to work for the money that is freely given to them, they would be more likely to find a job that actually pays better instead of working for the bare minimum provided by the government. No free cell phones. No free internet. No free this and that.

Those who don’t think it can work need look no further than the LDS Church’s Welfare Program. Here’s a great video that summarizes everything I’ve written here.

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“Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition.” –Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, Query 19, 1781

This entry was posted in Homelessness, Nanny Government, Religion, Volunteer work and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 at 11:37 am
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33 Responses to The Mormon Economy

  1. Petercat says: 1

    I am also a Mormon, and this article is spot-on.
    The reason that you don’t hear about the Mormon Church’s fast, effective, and non-denominational response to disasters is that we do not seek publicity or outside contributions. And the percentage of contributions that reach those who need help is among the highest of all charities.
    We do not reserve our aid only for members of our religion, unlike some other religions.

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  2. Nan G says: 2

    CJ, your article brought tears to my eyes.
    This is the way it is when people think of themselves as part of a larger community.
    My husband is a retired minister.
    We used to have an elderly lady in the congregation.
    She had been quite active when she was younger and had out-lived all her relatives.
    At one point we had a sign-up sheet so someone came over daily to bring her meals and visit with her.
    It was so impressive to see that sheet filled in the same day it was put up each month.
    Our nation has allowed our real sense of community to be destroyed under the guise of having ”community organizers.”
    Our families are being destroyed by the morals (or immorals) taught through TV and school room sex education where anything goes.
    To see that a large, well organized church is able to keep community and morals alive and well in this tainted society is a joy.
    Thanks again for sharing.

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  3. Silverfiddle says: 3

    I am not a Mormon, but I have a lot of respect for the LDS Church, for all the reasons in this article. I wish my church would follow the LDS example and disentangle itself from the government.

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  4. Common Sense says: 4

    Good article. Certainly not something you will find in the MSM rags. How dare we talk economics!! We need to stay focused on the fringe divisive issues in America vs jobs, our economy, healthcare, and our national debt. These are losers for 0blama because he has failed. Instead let’s talk about gay rights, abortion, and now the weather in Tampa. Another non event.

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  5. Liberal1 (objectivity) says: 5

    I used to be a Mormon, until I decided the all religions basically intolerant—except possibly for basic Buddhism—which is exemplified by an LDS Church publication called, “Mormonism and the Negro” (cannot find my copy which I’ve had since the late 60’/early 70′, but I think that’s the correct title). In my opinion religions only exist because of the ancient desire to be immortal. They are a tool of the State, and as such can’t be allowed to become too powerful because of their inclination to become a theocratic ruler—discriminating against those who don’t agree with them.

    I prefer a secular, State sponsored secular welfare system, so recipients don’t feel obliged to a particular sect for their appreciation. And although, the Mormon Church may not discriminate on the basis of religion in the provision of welfare, once they get their hooks into you they never let go—there’s nothing they like better than making you dependent of them until you come around to their belief (this is the pattern for evangelical religions).

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  6. Mike O'Malley says: 6

    @Liberal1 (objectivity):

    I used to be a Mormon, until I decided the all religions basically intolerant—except possibly for basic Buddhism

    Could you mean “bookstore” Buddhism perchance? Normative orthodox Buddhism maintains positions on social questions that are not so different than those of the Catholic Church.

    In my opinion religions only exist because of the ancient desire to be immortal.

    Then you are wrong. Generally religions do not provide an opportunity for adherents to become immortal. Belief in a general bodily resurrection emerged only slowly in Judaism (2nd Century BC during the time of the Maccabees). The ancient Egyptians believed in some form of immortality of the sacred elite and in time for others. For the rest, there was at most an after-existence as shadows in Sheol-Hades.

    Normative religions exists to maintain unity and internal peace within the community of believers.

    I prefer a secular, State sponsored secular welfare system, so recipients don’t feel obliged to a particular sect for their appreciation

    …. as opposed to feeling obligated to some local party ward healer, a Gruppenführer or party cadre for one’s welfare, life and oh so limited liberty?

    Yes it not as though the secular state has not time and time again demonstrated that there’s nothing they like better than making you dependent of them until you come around to their belief? LOLZ!

    If he were yet alive today, “I am the Law” boss Frank Hague, mayor of Jersey City, New Jersey, Democratic National Committeeman, and Vice-Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, would have much to teach you about dependency!

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  7. Lberal1[objective]
    no not objective you,
    what is the problem with you?
    you would have learn more if you had stayed there about those written words,
    didn’t you ever figure what it really meant? those words told me they where concern about negro suffering left to their own misery, needed some help from the MORMONS,
    you are still too ignorant to figure things said here every time you come,

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  8. Mike O'Malley says: 8

    @Liberal1 (objectivity):

    In my opinion religions only exist because of the ancient desire to be immortal.

    Christianity teaches that all ARE immortal, all will be resurrected. All will stand before the Judgment Throne.

    Ancient Egyptian Paganism taught that Anubis judged the dead. The righteous lived for ever. The unrighteous were eaten by the demon Ammit, the Destroyer.

    I’m curious. Can you show us just who had such an ancient desire to be immortal?

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  9. MataHarley says: 9

    @Liberal1 (objectivity): I prefer a secular, State sponsored secular welfare system, so recipients don’t feel obliged to a particular sect for their appreciation.

    So your theory requires swapping the church for government, and that makes it okay? LibZero, the LDS system doesn’t require conversion to the church and beliefs for aid. It requires that you work for your welfare aid. It also doesn’t “obligate” that you “appreciate” the aid. Of course, most humans would appreciate the chance to keep their self esteem intact and earn their benefits…. and generally appreciate those who gave them the opportunity to do so. Just not you, apparently.

    The primary difference is that the LDS welfare system functions off of willing donations by private citizens (tithing and donations) while the government welfare system functions off of taking it – without permission or approval of spending those funds in that way – from taxpayers. Then it hands it over to the welfare recipient without requesting any work in return.

    It seems that you support “something for nothing”, and don’t mind that the “something” is seized from the unwilling at the point of the IRS gun, so to speak. And the icing on the cake is that, according to you, there’s no obligation to appreciate that “something for nothing” because it’s government.

    So, why not tell us how the Mormons still have their “hook” into you?

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  10. Common Sense says: 10

    What are we really talking here? We are talking despicable Democrat tactics to somehow make Romney’s religious beliefs an issue of his ability to be President. It is disgraceful and despicable and for all you Democrats who say it isn’t the tactic, I say you full of krap!! How dare you!! BTW, I am NOT Mormon!!

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  11. Ivan says: 11

    @Nan G:

    Our families are being destroyed by the morals (or immorals) taught through TV and school room sex education where anything goes.

    Spot on.

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  12. MataHarley says: 12

    @Common Sense, actually what I think we’re talking about here is that there is a very good welfare model in the LDS system for welfare reform in the central and state governments. i.e. CJ’s last paragraphs about a volunteer/welfare work force that can reduce the payroll/pensions of the public sector. This is similar to using jailhouse road crews on road projects.

    What I find most interesting is that Romney is well aware of a way to reform government welfare because of his intimate knowledge of the LDS system. Yet he doesn’t speak of it. He may be staying away because that idea is based on the LDS method, and so few know much about Mormons. But I believe he should find a way to frame the concept of a smart program to the nation.

    But there will always be those like LibZero who’ll freak out that a good idea came from a church instead of an elected elite, or that the money comes from those giving freely instead of seized by government and doled out as they see fit… with all the waste and overhead involved.

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  13. CJ says: 13

    @Liberal1 (objectivity): I added a final quote at the end of this post, just for you.

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  14. kate j says: 14

    Liberal1:
    “once they get their hooks into you they never let go”
    Apparently you got away! But your own ideas would tend to enslave ever the more.

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  15. John Cooper says: 15

    In college, I used to mock the LDS church. When two missionaries knocked on my apartment door one day, I told them to come back next week and went to the library to study up on the religion just to put them down. That turned out to be pretty much of a stalemate, but then when I grew up and had a home of my own, my neighbors were Mormons. Originally I tried to mock them, too, but it wasn’t working. I found that I really admired their philosophy of family-centered self-sufficiency – if not their religious beliefs. I never joined the Mormon church, but I still highly admire their philosophy of life.

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  16. Nan G says: 16

    It has begun!
    Venues planned for Obama campaign speeches are backing out!
    UVA (University of Virginia) was one.

    UVA says the Obama campaign requested the use of one of two outdoor venues – the Amphitheater or the Harrison-Small Library plaza. The university declined the request for a number of reasons including class cancellations, which UVA estimates could be more than 186 classes on the second day of school. The other main reason is they would have to take on the full cost of security.

    More at NBC
    http://www.nbc29.com/story/19369132/obama-update

    See?
    Word is out!
    Obama spends OTHER PEOPLE’S MONEY like there’s no tomorrow!
    He runs up huge overtime costs for police but never pays.
    And his Obama For America won’t pay.
    And the DNC won’t pay.
    So the venue ends up sucking it up.
    Well, word is definitely out.

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  17. John Cooper
    hi,
    yes they deserve admiration for their charitable organize policy to help other by
    teaching them to fish in the water instead of giving them the fish,
    and I personally also admire their signing in a chorus of many hundreds in one voice the songs of patriotic AMERICA, which every one love to hear and enchanted by the display of their dedication to AMERICA THEY LOVE,
    WHO EVER CALL THE MORMONS A CULT ARE MOST IGNORANT OF THEM, THEY BELIEVE IN JESUS CHRIST SO THEY ARE NO CULT FOR SURE,
    I would think that the MINISTER JEREMY WRIGHT IS MORE CULT IF YOU WANT TO EQUATE IT WITH ANOTHER CHURCH,

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  18. CJ says: 18

    @John Cooper: I joined the church when I was 19 myself.

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  19. Petercat says: 19

    @Liberal1 (objectivity): “I prefer a secular, State sponsored secular welfare system, so recipients don’t feel obliged to a particular sect for their appreciation. And although, the Mormon Church may not discriminate on the basis of religion in the provision of welfare, once they get their hooks into you they never let go—there’s nothing they like better than making you dependent of them until you come around to their belief (this is the pattern for evangelical religions). ”
    Apparently, you don’t know much about the Mormon “welfare” system. It is designed to get people OFF of welfare as quickly as possible, through education in various areas such as financial management, nutrition, and other lifestyle decisions that affect dependency. Religious instruction and/or counseling.
    is optional.
    The last thing that we want is for people to become dependent on us!

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  20. Petercat says: 20

    ??? “You do not have permission to edit this comment.” ???
    I can’t edit my own comment???
    I meant to say “Religious instruction and/or counseling is optional.’

    ReplyReply
  21. Nan G says: 21

    I don’t know how much of the USA had the Mormon-owned supermarket chain called Alpha-Beta back in its day, but we had them in CA.
    They were the cleanest of all the stores.
    I never saw an expired date on the milk there.
    People of all colors worked there.
    They sold coffee and tea bags but they did not have an alcoholic beverage area.
    Not too many stores these days hold a candle to the old Alpha-Beta in terms of clean aisles and polite people.

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  22. Smorgasbord says: 22

    A long time ago I was eating in a restaurant in Utah, when a customer asked the waitress, “What’s it like since you left the Morman church.” She answered, “I look at it this way. I got a 10% raise and weekends off.”

    The way I understand it, the Morman church still believes that men can have as many wives as they want. To get admitted into the union, they agreed to having only one wife. Is this still true?

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  23. Smorgasbord
    you should not dwell in the old history,, as you see AMERICA HAS CHANGE THERE IS MORE CORRUPT PEOPLE WHO DON’T BELIEVE IN NOTHING AND THEY ARE DOING A LOT OF DAMAGE TRYING TO TEACH THE YOUNG THEIR CORRUPTION IS OKAY,
    BUT THE CHRISTIANITY EVOLVED INTO HARMONIOUS BEHAVIOR BECAUSE THEY STILL BELIEVE THERE IS GOD WHEN THINGS ARE NOT GOING RIGHT, AND THEY BELIEVE IN THEIR POWER TO VOTE DOWN THE ENABLER OF WRONG, AND THE FALSE PROMISES THEY HAVE SEEN FAILED FOR FOUR LONG YEARS, THE POWER OF THIS PEOPLE IS GREATER THAN ANYTHING IN THE WORLD WHEN THEY MARCH.
    TOGETHER THAT DAY TO CORRECT IT BY THE POWER GIVEN TO THEM BY THE FRAMERS SOME CENTURY AGO.
    IT’S NOT WISE TO KNOCK DOWN ANYONE, FOR YOUR PLEASURE TO SAY ANYTHING YOU WANT. YOU CAN OFFEND AND LEAVE A STAIN NOT DESERVED

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  24. Smorgasbord says: 24

    @ilovebeeswarzone: #23
    I just want to know if the Morman religion still thinks that men could have as many wives as they wanted if the USA didn’t stop them. In societies that allow this, shouldn’t women be allowed to have as many husbands as they want?

    This reminds me of the Bible verse that says one wife is enough: “Man cannot serve two masters.”

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  25. Smorgasbord
    is in it feeding the other side which are looking and out to hurt a very good and smart men who want to help AMERICA, THEY HAVE ALREADY ATTACK AND ACCUSE AND THEY HAVE NO SHAME, REMEMBER WHAT OBAMA DID TO DESTROY HIS OPPONENT BEFORE HE WAS PRESIDENT, HE WAS SEEKING THE POSITION IN A STATE, HE DIGG INTO THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HIS OPPONENT AND REGURGITATE ON A DIVORCE HE FOUND AND STAINED HIS REPUTATION, TO GAIN THE POWER SEAT,
    HE IS A RUTHLESS PERSON, AND STILL WAS ELECTED,
    INCREDIBLE IS IN IT? HE HAS THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE DIGGING
    AT THIS TIME, WE DON’T SEE THEIR SHOVELS BECAUSE THEY ARE DEEP IN THE DIRT, AND THEY ARE PAID TO DO IT, WITH THE PEOPLE’S MONEY
    BYE

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  26. CJ says: 26

    @Smorgasbord: No, we do not practice polygamy. This practice was banned a long time ago through revelation. Unfortunately, the intent of the practice was being abused by some and it was no longer needed for our purposes – which was to care for the widowed and poor and raise a righteous membership. Many of those widows were a result of the killings of Mormons that were sanctioned by state governments, such as Governor Boggs’ extermination order.

    Those that practice polygamy are excommunicated. The FLDS claims to be “LDS” and practices polygamy, but they are not LDS. They do not share the same beliefs we do and do not have the same canonized scriptures, but people still link them to us.

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  27. CJ says: 27

    @Smorgasbord: “I just want to know if the Morman[sic] religion still thinks that men could have as many wives as they wanted if the USA didn’t stop them.” No one can say this for certain, but I can tell you that it was not forced upon them to stop. Personally, I believe it still would have been stopped even if the Federal Government hadn’t pressured the state. Yes, there was a lot of pressure, but this was a church matter and not one of force.

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  28. Smorgasbord says: 28

    @ilovebeeswarzone: #25
    The democrats can’t get elected on what they have done. They have to convince the voters they aren’t as bad as the other candidate.

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  29. Smorgasbord
    hi,
    I just came back from FOX NEWS, TO READ ABOUT THE SEALS BOOK,
    there was no name of the one who told the address of the writer,
    and there was another line down below among other titles,
    it was again what I had seen before, about a book about OBAMA IF HE GET REELECTED,
    THIS one was telling of his plan to with the UN AND ISLAMIC COUNTRIES GET TOGETHER AND TAKE OVER THE USA,
    VERY SCARY STUFF, YES, AND THAT BOOK WILL SELL LIKE CANDY,
    I did not get the name of that one but it might be the same as AARON KLEIN TITLE FOOL ME ONCE, WAS AT HANNITY TO PROMOTE HIS BOOK, AND ALSO MENTION OF GREAT DANGER,
    BUT THE WORDS JUST NOW ABOUT IT WAS ANTICHRIST

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  30. Smorgasbord says: 30

    @CJ: #26
    Thanks for the info.

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  31. Smorgasbord says: 31

    @CJ: #27
    The way I understand it, they stopped so that they could become a state, otherwise, they would still be doing it. One Bible, but look how many religions came out of it. We all have our beliefs, and I will leave it at that.

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  32. Smorgasbord says: 32

    @ilovebeeswarzone: #29
    It’s nice to know that so many conservative books are selling so well.

    ReplyReply
  33. Randy says: 33

    @Silverfiddle: Did you learn about the Morman Church while serving with LDS members in the military?

    ReplyReply

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