11 Responses to “A Chink in the Knicks’ Armor”

  1. Skookum says: 1

    I was unaware of the definition of a chink in armor; I doubt if the author was aware of the 600 year old technological reference to armor or that he expected the public to know of the definition. More than likely, he thought he was being creative and cute; and there goes a career down the outhouse hole, with no one rushing to pick him up and gain leverage from his mistake.

    For me, a pun should have at least one meaning to be deciphered and preferably two. This one didn’t register on the pun scale. The man is guilty of being stupid and a failure as a punster; is this grounds for dismissal? Well of course, companies should expect the people they hire to be either witty or have an in-depth analysis. But that isn’t the reason they passed on to the public. Oh well, the SEIU has an excellent benefits package. Try to remember, you loyal Liberals, if you deviate from the Party Line, you can expect to be terminated; the author should keep that in mind in his next life, if he still wants to be a journalist.

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  2. Wisdom says: 2

    @Skookum: I’ve got to disagree with you on this one Skookum. Commenters use the “chink in the armor” phrase all the time, and most people generally know what it means, even if they don’t know the history behind it. It is more of cliche than a pun. If you google it, and go back about 35 pages through the listings to a time before the ESPN fiasco, you’ll see it got used in every context imaginable before then, without any negative connotation.

    Wordsmith is right. This whole situation is the result of oversensitive PC’s who are looking for any way they can to cast blame and cry bigotry. People shouldn’t have to google every sentence before they say them out loud or write them down to make sure they aren’t stepping on some racially sensitive toe, and the rest of us shouldn’t be so quick to cast blame when someone screws up. The reaction and apology by ESPN just makes it worse and did more to acknowledge the power of the grammar assassins that it did to calm racial adversity.

    On a lighter note, a community college here in Wyoming hired a guy named Del Nose to coach their college rodeo team last month. The headline read, “Northwest Picks Nose.” I’m sure that someone should have been fired over that one! :-)

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  3. GaffaUK says: 3

    Firing someone over this was probably an overeaction particularly if the pun wasn’t meant (although that is hard to believe). Yet calling someone a chink is offensive and should be avoided or do we become relaxed with all the rascist words of years gone by and start punning on those?

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  4. Richard Wheeler says: 4

    Guy should for fired for outright stupidity.Everyone knows “chink” is derogatory like gook or the “n” word.
    2nd problem “Chink in Knicks armour” connotes weakness. A losing team with it’s super star Carmelo Anthony out injured,has gone 8 and 2 since Lin took over at point guard averaging 20+ points and 7+ assists. An incredible addition of strength not a weakening chink. This guy should be on home and garden or the cooking network.

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  5. MataHarley says: 5

    @Wisdom: Northwest Picks Nose…

    Oh man, Wisdom… thought I’d die laughing reading that one!

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  6. johngalt says: 6

    @Richard Wheeler:

    Guy should for fired for outright stupidity.Everyone knows “chink” is derogatory like gook or the “n” word.

    That’s actually what I thought when I first saw this. Never mind whether one believes that the world has gone too PC or not, the fact that many people would possibly be outraged by the headline should clue people in to ensure they proofread a headline like that and maybe even get another opinion prior to publishing it. To me, the fact that the guy wrote that headline and allowed it to go through means he is stupid. Unless, of course, he was trying to get fired, which would just be weird.

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  7. Wordsmith says: 7

    @GaffaUK:

    Yet calling someone a chink is offensive and should be avoided or do we become relaxed with all the rascist words of years gone by and start punning on those?

    Should we really allow certain words to hold such power over our emotions? What about symbols? A swastika? How about historically in Buddhism? What’s the proper emotional response? Does intent matter, or just the way people react, regardless of the motive of the one using a word or a symbol?

    An interesting book that comes to mind is this one. (I remember catching an episode of Boston Public that made mention of this book).

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  8. GaffaUK says: 8

    @Wordsmith

    Of course words have power over our emotions. Simply look at this site to see how emotions go sky high over words – e.g. Teabaggers, Wing-nuts, moonbat, retard etc etc. It is naive to think otherwise. And symbols too. Would you wave a swastika outside a synagogue and tell people it’s a Buddhist symbol and tell them to relax? Or how about parading some KKK symbols in the Bronx? People know that a lot of words and symbols have more than one meaning and that is why context and intent matters. Chink in the armor as a phrase is fine generally but when used in context in regards to a Chinese player who isn’t a weakness to the team – is inappropriate and at best clumsy. I fail to see why if it was an intended pun – it’s as you put it – clever? What’s clever with racist insults? Do you call your asian friends and colleagues chinks?

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  9. MATA
    that was SKOOK with NORTHWEST PICK NOSE,
    and I cannot stop laughing on this one, even if MR NOSE would be in front of me,
    bye

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  10. Wordsmith says: 10

    @GaffaUK:

    @Wordsmith

    Of course words have power over our emotions. Simply look at this site to see how emotions go sky high over words – e.g. Teabaggers, Wing-nuts, moonbat, retard etc etc. It is naive to think otherwise.

    My question to you was, “should it?” Should people so easily allow their emotions controlled and manipulated? Should their buttons be so easy to push? And so then, whose problem is it? Is the person using the hateful rhetoric the one causing actual harm or is it how the other person receives it? Probably both.

    I fail to see why if it was an intended pun – it’s as you put it – clever? What’s clever with racist insults? Do you call your asian friends and colleagues chinks?

    Actually, I can call them that and more: gooks, nips, @sswipes, etc. for the very fact that they are my friends. As you say, context and intent matter. By calling my friends names, is my intention to actually harm them?

    Whether Federico was even thinking of the racial connotations of “chink” or not when he made his phrase (and “chink in the armor” certainly would be a race-neutral, normative phrase when applied to anyone else of non-Chinese descent), what was his intentions? Was it to be racially insulting with intent to do emotional harm? I think not. Stupid and insensitive (and ignorant if the association of “chink=Chinese” was not known to him) perhaps; but for that, I just shrug my shoulders. Just as Lin himself seems to have done. My point is that people stir up a lot of brouhaha over the most insignificant of slights, making them rise to the level of offense and hypersensitivity that I’d say, by a stretch, is related to the kind of emotional attachment and response that gives rise to violent uproar over a few Korans being accidentally burned.

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  11. Pingback: ESPN - Chink In The Armor Only The Beginning | The Strident Conservative

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