7 Jul

CIA EIT Program Exonerated…..AGAIN!

                                       

Toward the end of last month, WaPo and other newspapers reported how the Department of Justice, after re-investigating 101 cases, found only 2 CIA-custody deaths that are still possibly worth pursuing as criminal cases. The Agency is relieved but still unsettled over the stress of criminal investigations being conducted (yet again) when they had tread carefully to insure that everything they were doing in the EIT program was legally covered.

“It’s good that he’s narrowed things down to two cases,” the former CIA official said. “On the other hand, he’s been looking at these cases for two years and all he can say is they need more investigating? It’s draining on people involved. On resources. We need some sort of finality.”

Human rights groups and the ACLU are disappointed and bewildered as to how the DoJ is refusing to prosecute any CIA personnel, let alone Bush & company, only bothering to pursue a look into “any unauthorized” interrogation techniques overseas- not the ones used and approved of in the CIA EIT program. After all, didn’t President Obama and Holder call what the CIA did to detainees under the EIT program as constituting “torture”?

Former Bush-speech writer and torture denier (author of the book, Courting Disaster) Marc Thiessen explains what the real outrage should be over:

During the Bush administration, career prosecutors from the Eastern District of Virginia conducted an exhaustive inquiry into allegations of abuse in the CIA program and decided against prosecutions in all but one case (a CIA contractor, not in the official interrogation program, who was later convicted of assault). The prosecutors drafted “declination memos” explaining precisely why they decided not to pursue charges. Not only did Holder, a political appointee, overrule the decisions of these career prosecutors, according to The Post, “Before making his decision to reopen the cases, Holder did not read detailed memos that prosecutors drafted and placed in files to explain their decision to decline prosecutions” (emphasis added).

Holder charged ahead over the vigorous objections of seven former CIA directors, who declared in a letter to President Obama that “Holder’s decision to re-open the criminal investigation creates an atmosphere of continuous jeopardy for those whose cases the Department of Justice had previously declined to prosecute” and “will seriously damage the willingness of many other intelligence officers to take risks to protect the country.” Joining their objections was Obama’s then-CIA director, Leon Panetta, who reportedly made his views known in a “profanity-laced screaming match” at the White House.

None of this deterred Holder from pursuing his ideologically driven crusade against the CIA’s interrogators. During the 2008 presidential campaign, Holder had told the left-wing American Constitution Society that “our government authorized the use of torture” and promised the crowd, “We owe the American people a reckoning.” Now — after two years of wasted resources and untold grief for these dedicated intelligence officers — Holder has come up empty. The special prosecutor he assigned to deliver that day of “reckoning” came to the same conclusion as the career prosecutors under the Bush administration: Further investigation of the CIA’s interrogation program “is not warranted.”

And what about the two leftover cases involving the death of two detainees who were never a part of the CIA’s EIT program?

The two remaining cases reportedly involve a detainee who froze to death in his cell in Afghanistan in 2002 and another who died in American custody in Iraq in 2003. As Panetta noted in a statement last week, “Both cases were previously reviewed by career federal prosecutors who subsequently declined prosecution.” According to former senior intelligence officials I spoke with, both were battlefield detentions that took place early in the war, and neither had anything to do with the CIA’s interrogation program.

Thiessen concludes his piece with a lament on the lives of CIA heroes whose lives and careers have been negatively affected and ruined by these drawn out, repeat investigations and the slanderous charges made by so-called “human rights” groups, shaping anti-American public opinion and perceptions about the CIA, the Bush Administration, and our country.

The controversy will not end as a new book by former CIA officer Glenn L. Carle is slated to hit the bookstores this summer, focused on his interrogation of al-Qaeda suspect, Pacha Wazir.

This entry was posted in Baracks Broken Promises, CIA interrogation program. Bookmark the permalink. Thursday, July 7th, 2011 at 12:36 am
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7 Responses to CIA EIT Program Exonerated…..AGAIN!

  1. anticsrocks says: 1

    And it is too damn bad that no one is able to make Holder accountable for the misery and destruction he has brought into the lives of our brave CIA operatives.
    .
    .

    ReplyReply
  2. HOLDER should investigate the ennemies who are responsable for killing the CIA,
    IN AFGHANISTAN, INSTEAD OF DISRUPTING THE INTELLIGENCE BUREAU WITH THEIR HASSEL.
    It’s obvious to see, their purpusly attempt to discredit any other in power position that could one day become their judge into allegations of what is going on in his own department that he omit to take a stand on or took the wrong side to defend with wrong intent,
    HOLDER’S ACTIONS WILL SOMEDAY COME BACK TO HAUNT HIM BY BEING SCRUTINISE ON ALL HIS ACTIONS AGAINST ANYONE STATES WHOM HE CHOOSE TO FIGHT,
    HE MUST REMEMBER THAT THEY ALL HAVE A FILE ON HIM, HEAVYER AS TIME GOES BY

    ReplyReply
  3. Nan G says: 3

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/06/29/press-conference-president
    Obama had this question asked:
    MARK LANDER:
    Admiral McRaven testified before Congress that he was concerned that there wasn’t a clear procedure to be followed if a terrorist were captured alive abroad.

    What message do you have for American men and women in uniform who are undertaking missions, like the very risky one to capture and kill bin Laden, about what they should do in the event that they capture someone alive? And does the lack of these clear procedures raise the risk that forces might be more inclined to kill suspected terrorists in the field, rather than capture them alive, thus depriving the U.S. of the intelligence that they could provide?

    OBAMA:
    I think it’s important to understand, and the American people need to be assured that anytime we initiate a mission like this, our top priorities are making sure this person is not able to carry out attacks against the United States and that we’re able to obtain actionable intelligence from those individuals. And so that mitigates against this danger that you’re suggesting that our main goal is going to be to kill these individuals as opposed to potentially capturing them. Okay?

    Anyone want to take a stab at diagramming that bolded sentence?
    Gobbledy-gook.
    What do you think Obama meant?
    It could go any of several ways!

    ReplyReply
  4. When ‘Fast and Furious’ finally completely unwinds, Karma will deliver to Eric “My People” Holder the justice he deserves – impeachment.

    d(^_^)b
    http://libertyatstake.blogspot.com/
    “Because the Only Good Progressive is a Failed Progressive”

    ReplyReply
  5. Warren says: 5

    Good post, Wordsmith

    Human rights groups and the ACLU are disappointed and bewildered as to how the DoJ is refusing to prosecute any CIA personnel … Have we EVER seen “human rights groups” or the ACLU disappointed about the VICTIMS of the terrorists?

    Thiessen concludes his piece with a lament on the lives of CIA heroes whose lives and careers have been negatively affected and ruined by these drawn out, repeat investigations and the slanderous charges made by so-called “human rights” groups… Were human rights groups and the ACLU disappointed and bewildered about these people?

    During the Bush administration, career prosecutors from the Eastern District of Virginia conducted an exhaustive inquiry into allegations of abuse in the CIA program and decided against prosecutions … Did human rights groups and the ACLU weigh in on this?

    ReplyReply
  6. Warren, I suppose that A BUNCH of them went for a FLOTTILLA VACATION IN GREECE,
    BYE

    ReplyReply
  7. Pingback: Making Heads Explode | Flopping Aces

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