28 Jan

Do Felons Deserve a Second Chance, Obama Thinks So [Reader Post]

                                       

Should convicted felons be given a second chance? Barack Obama thinks so, and he thinks the tax payers should have to foot the bill. He made his view on this issue more than evident during a town hall meeting in Elyria, Ohio on January 22nd. Here is a excerpt from this Ohio town hall meeting, where a 29 year old felon who has never had a job in his life asks Obama if he will help felons get a job.

Jerome the felon asks Obama:

“I’m 29 years old, and I’ve never had a job in my life. I went to jail when I was younger. It’s like hard to get a job as a felon. Is this — any programs that hire people with felonies like something that — because it’s sad, it’s like — 29 years old, I’m 29.”

Obama Answers Jerome:

“Look, I’m proud of the fact that you’re bringing this up because there are people who’ve made mistakes, particularly when they’re young, and it is in all of our interests to help them redeem themselves and then get on a straight path. Now, I don’t blame employers obviously for being nervous about hiring somebody who has a record. It’s natural if they’ve got a lot of applicants for every single job that that’s a question that they’d have in their minds. On the other hand, I think one of the great things about America is we give people second chances.

And so what we’ve tried to do — and I want to say, this has been a bipartisan effort — when I was in the Senate, working with Sam Brownback; my Vice President, Joe Biden — passing a Second Chance Act that helps to fund programs that help the reintegration of ex-felons.

It’s smart for us to do. You know, sometimes people say, well, that’s just coddling people. No; you reduce the recidivism rate, they pay taxes, it ends up being smart for taxpayers to do.”

Shame on Jerome, if he really wanted a job he could get one. He is playing the victim card. In reality he is only a victim of his own bad decisions. Taxpayers already pay for convicts to be in prison, now Obama wants us to pay to get them a job? Don’t get me wrong, I believe everyone(well, almost everyone) deserves a second chance, but it is not the responsibility of everyone else to provide that second chance.

Now before you start sending me nasty emails saying “you are stupid, and you just don’t understand how hard it is for felons to get a job.” Please allow me to stray from the beaten path for a moment and tell you a bit about my own experience.

I am a convicted felon. Five felonies to be exact. I spent the later part of my teenage years (15-19 years old) as a drug addict. Between ages 18 – 19, I lived out of the back of an Oldsmobile, and skipped around from job to job (i kept getting fired for some odd reason, hmm) to raise money for my heroin habit. I continued this pattern of living until I was finally arrested, charged with 9 felonies, convicted of 5 felonies, and sentenced to 1 year and 2 months in prison. One day, as I was sitting in my cell, I thought to myself, “this isn’t the life I want. I want something better, and I’m going to get.” So I made a plan for what I was going to do when I got out, and I decided to use my time in there wisely by educating myself. I started studying college algebra, then moved on to calculus and finally computer science. I also applied for college while I was in prison, so I could attend as soon as I got out. My release day came, and guess what, I went out and got a job flipping burgers the next day.

I worked the early shift at my new job . Public buses didn’t run that early in the morning(in VA, if you receive a felony conviction you lose your license), so I walked to work, 5 miles, every morning. When my shift was over, I hoped on a bus, and went to the local community college to take a couple of classes. When I got out of class the buses weren’t running so I walked home, 4 miles, every night. This process repeated everyday for 9 months until I finally saved up enough money to pay off all of my court costs, and go through all of the red tape required to get my license back. When I finally got my license and my car back, I went out searching for a new, better job. I found 2 jobs. Who would have thought that a convict could get 2 jobs (Jerome couldn’t seem to find 1 in 29 years). I met a wonderful girl at one of these jobs, and we eventually got hitched! Fast forward 4 years and I am happily married, the proud owner of a brand new home, 6.5 years sober, have a good job, and I am almost done with a bachelors degree in computer science (I pay my own way through school, so I only take as many classes as I can afford).

I told you this story to tell you this. I know it is hard to get a job if you are a felon. I do understand. However, if you are a felon, you are not a victim of society, you are a victim of your actions. It is not the responsibility of tax payers to provide you with a second, it is your responsibility. In the United States there are infinite possibilities for a second chance, but you have to go out and get it. It will not come to you. Don’t let your criminal record hold you back, use it as a lesson in life. If you work hard, pursue your dreams, and strive to be a good citizen, good things will happen. That is the beauty of liberty and freedom, you have every opportunity to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and get on the right track in life. How could you not love a country that has allowed a drug addicted, homeless convict to become a sober, homeowner, with a beautiful wife, and lives the American dream everyday. God Bless America!

Crossposted from Liberty and Pride

This entry was posted in Barack Obama, Law Enforcement. Bookmark the permalink. Thursday, January 28th, 2010 at 9:19 am
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718 Responses to Do Felons Deserve a Second Chance, Obama Thinks So [Reader Post]

  1. I am a convicted felon that has grew living a life of crime since rhe age of 13. I blame only myself and have never played the victim. Scientist recently did a study and placed baby mice with perfect vision into total darkness for their first year of life. Those mice became blind and never were able to see again. With that being said, i was a product of my invironment and spent many years stumbling and paying for past mistakes. I am now a 38 year old single dad of 3 teenagers and also a successful business owner. I also have a non profit called UrbanBizDirectory that teaches convicted felons and troubled youth how to start a business. I had to create my own second chance. Jesus came for the sick.

    ReplyReply
  2. Eric Harris
    strange is in it, you traveled to both extremes of life, you left the first one in time,
    you are still so young for having carried such a big load,
    i am happy for you as you are saved, and so many good years awaiting you,
    with your children you can be proud to be with them,
    i am also happy that you came here to leave hope to other trying to find work
    and some are desperate, this is a GLIMMER OF A LIGHT TO HOLD ON, to them showing them the way to never give up, BECAUSE THERE IS ALWAYS A TOMORROW DIFFERENT,
    BEST TO YOU,
    EDIT: ERIC , IF YOU FEEL LIKE GIVING TIPS AND HOW TO,
    PLEASE DO SO,
    HERE YOU WOULD REACH A VERY MANY FELONS, NEEDING CLUES AND ALL YOU WANT TO TEACH THEM,

    ReplyReply
  3. monica says: 703

    I’m Peruvian and my sister and brother born in Usa, I miss my mom and family so much and I use the american passaport of my sister to USA and they deport me, I deserve a second change miss all my family.

    ReplyReply
  4. Howard says: 704

    Hi ilovebeeswarzone,

    Good to hear from you…I hope all is well. Lots of questions above….First, I don’t believe I said your potential would be “dim”…what I probably said is that you will likely face additional challenges that people without a record don’t have to encounter. What shows up on background reports varies by company and the vendor they use to pull the reports. I can’t speak for all companies so I will only speak for mine.

    At my company, we don’t just run a state background check, but rather a national background and sex offender check. Our company’s application specifically asks for any felony convictions (not interested in traffic or misdemeanors). Again, it depends on the company and what’s important to them.

    The length of time a charge stays on your background varies by the charge and the state. You may need to contact an attorney to obtain the specifics. If you feel there is a charge on your background that should no longer be there you need to look into having it expunged. That is usually handled by the agency that put it there.

    Again, I can’t speak for whether or not employers are following “blanket” policies. I can only speak for mine and we evaluate every issue on a case by case basis depending on the nature of the crime and the role for which they are applying.

    Hope this helps.

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  5. Bryan Miller says: 705

    It’s very difficult now and has been for a while. I applied to hundreds of jobs and took me a long time to find one. But I never give up and I’m patience, which is not always easy.

    Bryan

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  6. HOWARD
    thank”s for the good advices, there is many felons reading ,
    and will take any advice to liftup their life to a better situation,
    THEY NEED ALL THEY CAN GET FROM THE GOOD PEOPLE WHO CARE FOR THEM,
    AM I RIGHT TO SAY , THEIR NUMBER IS AROUND 20 THOUSANDS IN AMERICA,
    WE HAVE NO RIGHTS TO TRY TO MAKE THEM INVISIBLE, BECAUSE THEY HAVE A HEART BEAT
    JUST LIKE THE WHOLE SOCIETY, THEY LOVE SOMEONE, THEY HAVE CHILDREN LIKE OTHER FAMILY,
    THEY ARE AMERICANS, NOT ILLEGALS, THEY ARE FIRST IN JOBS FINDING,
    AND THE BUSINESS BETTER GET IT, IF THEY CLAIM TO BE FOR AMERICA, AND HIRE THEM,
    BEST TO YOU,

    ReplyReply
  7. Howard
    here i come again to mention that when there is opening in your company,
    we have experts here to fill it perfectly,
    you just ask here, FOR THEM TO READ IT,
    BYE

    ReplyReply
  8. BRYAN Miller
    hi,
    you bring hope to all here,
    that’s the food they need desperatly, so to,
    never give up, never give up, WE HAVE ALL A MOUNTAIN TO CLIME, SOME MOUNTAIN ARE SO HIGH,
    THEY CLOUD THE SUN, BUT ONCE WE ARE ON TOP, IT SHINE SO BRIGHT, IT MAKE ONE BLINK,
    BEST TO YOU,

    ReplyReply
  9. FMB42 says: 709

    Jerome to 0Muslim;
    “I’m 29 years old, and I’ve never had a job in my life.”

    Ten to one says that Jerome has never seriously looked for a job. Otherwise he most likely would have said; “I’m 29 years old, and I can’t get a job due to my felony record”.

    Meanwhile, a lot of Dims, and young “adults” (same diff), just don’t want to understand that you almost always have to look for a job to get a job. Funny how that works huh? These people often make a career out of making up excuses for not working.

    ReplyReply
  10. Mr. Perfect (Intro)

    A true story of family and the infinite mercy of Jesus Christ. Mr. Perfect takes a detailed

    look at the detrimental life of the streets and the underworld of robberies, home

    invasions, and selling cocaine. A story of repentance and sacrifice of a young man who

    grew up impoverished and found success in the dope game at a very early age , only to

    ultimately end up in prison, where he began to study the lucrative urban market. While

    serving 2 years in a Florida State prison , Eric Harris wrote a 10 year business plan. After

    his release, he walked a thin line between being a successful businessman and a cocaine

    trafficker in central Florida. All the while raising his 3 young children from his ex-wife,

    who was diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor, all alone , as a single father. With 12

    felony convictions on his record , several brushes with death and federal indictments, he

    began to sink deeper into the dope game and it started to take a toll on his spiritually.

    Growing up in the Church and being taught right from wrong he knew that it was never

    o.k. to do the wrong thing, even if it was for the right reason. Mr. Perfect sought to get his

    piece of the American pie through any means necessary. Only to learn that his life had

    already been blessed to be perfect through his undying love for Jesus…..

    http://mrpefect89.blogspot.com/2014/04/mr_3139.html?m=1

    ReplyReply
  11. David says: 711

    A convicted rapist from mexico that entered the U.S. illegally and fished his way through the system obtains a real estate license . A 41 year old working U.S. citizen with a Non violent Felony conviction dating back 21 years is denied the same License .

    ReplyReply
  12. David
    THE ONE FROM MEXICO bought the politician,
    the other didn”t because he is a proud AMERICAN EXPECTING LINIENCY FROM HIS USA,
    WHICH FAIL HIM,

    ReplyReply
  13. David says: 713

    I Guess the rule Book gets thrown away when you enter the country Illegally . For Them ,RULE Number One ( no rules apply ) .

    ReplyReply
  14. you can call me Ed says: 714

    i’m in community college in a nursing program. i was convicted of child pornography. it is easily available on the internet on the government website for you to see. i’m a tow truck helper now. i passed anatomy 101 on my first try while it took the other people 2-3 tries. if i’m not able to get into the nursing program which needs a background check THEN I WILL SUE

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  15. you can call me Ed
    i DON’T SEE YOU IN NURSING,
    WHY DID YOU CHOSE THAT WORK,
    THERE IS SO MANY MORE FOR ONE WHO LIKED TO SEE CHILD PORNOGRAPHY,
    ONCE IS TOO MANY,
    YOU COULD BE AN HELPER OF A BOXER, DOING TRAINING AND PROMOTION,
    ON HIS BEHALF, YOU COULD MAKE GOOD MONEY,
    GOOD LUCK

    ReplyReply
  16. Vice President says: 716

    I had an intern with a severe anxiety problem. The week before his internship ended, he approached me and explained his anxiety problem: He was a convicted felon. I proceeded to look up his court record (all court records are available through the state’s judiciary case search system) and was able to find a marijuana arrest, which is no big deal. He explained that his arrest was in a different state and that it was over a small street-fight where no one was seriously injured. I was stunned that it was even a felony. He stated that he didn’t think he would be able to find a job. But, if that is the case, then what is rehabilitation about if someone goes to jail and doesn’t get rehabilitated? I told him that he should be able to find another position. The key is that the first position is the hardest to get. I suggested that he look up all of the property management companies that he wanted to work for and contact each of them one-by-one to find out the application process. I told him that he could use me as a reference and I gave him a reference letter. It took him a year, but he has a full-time position now.

    ReplyReply
  17. Vice President
    that is very kind of you to help a person desperately trying to find a job,
    as a Vice President you might have some jobs opening in your busyness also,
    tell us when you do so to continue the good will you have to help,
    there are many skilled people here, just waiting to get their chance to prove their qualifications are more
    than just talk,
    best to you,

    ReplyReply
  18. monica
    you come from a very old country which have a great history<
    and a very well like by the tourists who discover beauty in there,
    PERU IS A WELL KNOWN VERY HONORABLE COUNTRY,
    there maybe a way to get a pasport for visiting to begin with for you,
    JUST CHECK ABOUT IT, AND THEN TIME CAN GIVE YOU MORE AS YOU SHOW THAT YOU DID A MISTAKE,
    AND ARE NOT EVER DOING ANY OF IT ,
    BYE

    ReplyReply

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